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    Breaking: Scientists developed new solar-powered device that makes water out of air

    Scientists now have a solution to the problem of water shortage in some areas including desserts.

    A group of scientists has created a solar-powered device that can produce clean and drinking water out of air, even in dessert areas.

    Evelyn Wang, an associate mechanical engineering professor at MIT and co-author of the paper first published in the journal "Science" said, 


    "I'm most excited about being able to realize a functioning device in these remote areas and to be able to provide clean water to all the people who need it," 


    The new device looks like a box. Inside the box is a layer of a custom metal-organic framework (also called a MOF), which is essentially a material that acts as a sponge to capture as much water as possible when the box is open. Water can be collected from the air and rain.
    Once the water is captured, the box is closed manually and exposed to the sun. The sun heats up the material so it releases water from its surface in the vapor phase. The vapor is then converted to the liquid phase with a condenser -- which can cool the vapor even in hot climates -- to create clean drinking water.



    It's capable of collecting 2.8 liters of water per kilogram of metal-organic framework that is used. It can do this in areas where the humidity level is as low as 20%, compared to existing devices that work in 50% humidity.
    MOFs are one-, two- or three-dimensional compounds invented about 20 years ago by Berkeley professor Omar Yaghi, one of the researchers behind the new device. They are an extremely porous material and water molecules can easily attach to the framework. The MOF used in the new device is called MOF-801, which was first reported a few years ago.
    The prototype is currently the size of a small tissue box, but the final product is expected to be about as big as a carry-on suitcase so it can produce enough water for a family of four. The researchers do not have a cost estimate yet, but they plan to work with not-for-profits and local governments in the developing world to distribute the device.
    It's designed for places that are extremely dry, but that still have a lot of sun, such as North Africa and India. "We can deploy [the] devices in those types of regions, where all they need is this device and sun," Wang said.
    Source: CNN

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